Ada Lovelace: The Countess Who Dreamed in Numbers 

Ada Lovelace: The Countess who Dreamed in Numbers

This work of historical fiction tells the astonishing story of the real-life young woman who saw the coming of the computer age nearly a century before it occurred. Feisty, rebellious and beautiful, Ada Lovelace, born Ada Byron (1815-1852), was also a genius known for writing the very first computer programs. If you would like a signed copy of the book, please order below.

$13.00

The Kindle version is available on Amazon for $4.99.

Who was Ada Lovelace?

Augusta Ada Byron, Countess of Lovelace, the true-life daughter of the wildly popular poet Lord Byron, was born in London on December 10, 1815. Ada was a gifted mathematician who worked with inventor Charles Babbage, and wrote a description and instructions for his invention called the Analytical Engine – a prototype for the world’s first computer. Because she foresaw the coming computer age, she is considered the first computer programmer.

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About the book:

Ada Lovelace: the Countess Who Dreamed in Numbers is a carefully researched novel that tells the astonishing story of the real-life young woman who saw the coming of the computer age nearly a century before it occurred. Feisty, rebellious and beautiful, Ada Lovelace, born Ada Byron [1815-1852], was also a genius known for writing the very first computer programs.

The only legitimate daughter of poet Lord Byron, a man exiled from England for his scandalous poetry, wild sexual exploits and gambling debts, Ada inherited her father’s imagination – much to her mother’s horror.

Desperate to keep her daughter respectable, Lady Byron tutored Ada rigorously in mathematics, hoping to quash any creative impulses her daughter might have.

Ada’s life grows more complicated when Lord Byron apparently returns to England. She’s thrilled when her father begins to visit her in secret, but will he help or hurt Ada’s dream of being recognized as a true scientist?

 

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